North Luangwa National Park


North Luangwa spans a total of 4636 square kilometres, offering one of the best wilderness experiences in Zambia.

Experience the wild and untouched beauty and upclose dramas of wildlife encounters. Although declared a wilderness area, North Luangwa was not open to anyone other than rangers for more than 30 years.

In 1984, Major John Harvey and his wife Lorna sought permission to conduct walking safaris in the area and for many years were the only operators in this remote wilderness. Then in 1989, two scientists, Mark and Delia Owens, famous for their book ‘Cry of the Kalahari’, were granted permission to set up a research station in the Park. Through their influence and as a means of helping to curb poaching in the area, the authorities allowed entry to a few more safari operators who bring limited numbers into the Park for guided walking safaris and game drives. Their efforts in the North Luangwa are documented in their book ‘Survivors Song / The Eye of the Elephant’.

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Accommodation in North Luangwa National Park

North Luangwa National Park's Best Lodges

Takwela Camp by Remote Africa Safaris

Takwela Camp, the latest camp operated by Remote Africa Safaris, opened in July 2019 in the North Luangwa.

Mwaleshi Camp by Remote Africa Safaris

Located in the vast wilderness of North Luangwa National Park, Mwaleshi Camp is hidden within a scenic bend of the Mwaleshi River.


Other places to Visit

Zambia's Hotspots

Livingstone

Lower Zambezi is still relatively undeveloped, with it’s beauty lying in its wilderness state. The diversity of animals is not as wide as the other big parks, but the opportunities to get close to game, wandering in and out of the Zambezi channels are spectacular.

Liuwa Plain

The remote Liuwa National Park lies along the Zambezi flood plain in western Zambia and covers an area of 3,600 square kilometres of remote, wildlife-rich wilderness.

South Luangwa National Park

South Luangwa has been dubbed by experts as one of the greatest wildlife sanctuaries in the world, and with good reason. The concentration of animals around the Luangwa River, and its oxbow lagoons, is among the most intense in Africa.

Kafue National Park

Found in the centre of western Zambia, Kafue National Park is the oldest and largest of Zambia’s national parks. It covers a massive 22,400 km2.

Lower Zambezi National Park

Lower Zambezi is still relatively undeveloped, with it’s beauty lying in its wilderness state. The diversity of animals is not as wide as the other big parks, but the opportunities to get close to game, wandering in and out of the Zambezi channels are spectacular.